Workplace Employee Relations Survey (workplace + employee_relations_survey)

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Business, Economics, Finance and Accounting


Selected Abstracts


Opportunities to work at home in the context of work-life balance

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT JOURNAL, Issue 1 2002
Alan Felstead
Discussion of ,work-life balance' and ,family-friendly' employment is much in vogue among politicians and business leaders. Often, but not always, working at home is included within such practices. However, the concepts of work-life balance and family-friendly are commonly left ill-defined by researchers and policymakers alike. In this article we outline formal definitions of these terms, which place spatial issues - and hence working at home - at the heart of the debate. This leads us on to examine working at home through the theoretical lens offered by attempts to explain the rise of work-life balance arrangements. Twelve hypotheses emerge from the literature and are tested on the management data contained in the 1998 Workplace Employee Relations Survey or WERS98. Many of these hypotheses pass weak statistical tests but fail on stronger logistic regression tests. The article shows that the option to work at home is more likely to be available in the public sector, large establishments and work environments in which individuals are responsible for the quality of their own output. These workplaces are typically less unionised but not especially feminised. [source]


Trade Union Presence and Employer-Provided Training in Great Britain

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, Issue 3 2004
REN╔ BÍHEIM
Using linked employer-employee data from the British 1998 Workplace Employee Relations Survey, we find a positive correlation between workplace union recognition and private-sector employer-provided training. We explore the avenues through which union recognition might affect training by interacting recognition with the closed shop, the level at which pay bargaining takes place, and multiunionism. For non-manual-labor men and women, only union recognition matters. The various types of collective-bargaining institutions have no separate effect. However, the male manual training probability is significantly increased by union presence only through multiple unionism with joint negotiation. In contrast, for women manual workers, union recognition at the workplace has no effect on the training probability. [source]


The Impact of Gender Similarity on Employee Satisfaction at Work: A Review and Re-Evaluation*

JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES, Issue 8 2005
Riccardo Peccei
abstract We used data from the British 1998 Workplace Employee Relations Survey (WERS98) to examine key unanswered questions about the impact of gender similarity on employee satisfaction at work. The study sample consisted of 11,848 men and 11,278 women from over 1700 workplaces across Britain. In line with gender-specific compositional arguments, the effects of gender similarity were found to be asymmetrical for men and women, with similarity tending to have a greater positive impact on men than on women. The effects involved were primarily linear in nature. Net of the potentially confounding influence of other factors, they were also found to be quite weak, weaker than has commonly been suggested in the literature. [source]


Human Capital Spillovers within the Workplace: Evidence for Great Britain,

OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS & STATISTICS, Issue 5 2003
Harminder Battu
Abstract In this paper, we use a unique matched worker,workplace data set to estimate the effect on own earnings of co-workers' education. Our results, using the 1998 GB Workplace Employee Relations Survey, show significant effects. An independent, significantly positive effect from average workplace education is evident; own earnings premia from years of education fall only slightly when controlling for workplace education. This result suggests that the social returns to education are strongly positive , working with colleagues who each had 1.2 years (1 standard deviation) of more education than the average worker, boosts own earnings by 11.1%. An additional year of any single co-worker's education is worth about 3.2% of an additional own year of education. We also test for interactions between own and co-worker education levels and for ,skills incompatibility' when worker education levels are heterogeneous. The interactions appear negative: own education is not much valued at workplaces where co-workers' education levels are already high. There is no evidence that workplace heterogeneity in worker education levels adversely affects own earnings. This result runs counter to theoretical predictions, and suggests that workers compete in tournaments for high-paying jobs. [source]


EMPLOYEE TRAINING AND WAGE COMPRESSION IN BRITAIN*

THE MANCHESTER SCHOOL, Issue 3 2005
FILIPE ALMEIDA-SANTOS
We use linked data for 1460 workplaces and 19,853 employees from the Workplace Employee Relations Survey 1998 to analyse the incidence and duration of employee training in Britain. We find training to be positively associated with having a recognized vocational qualification and current union membership. However, being non-white, having shorter current-job tenure and part-time or fixed-term employment statuses are all associated with less training. Furthermore, in line with recent non-competitive training models, higher levels of wage compression (measured in absolute or relative terms) are positively related to training. [source]


Organizational-Level Gender Dissimilarity and Employee Commitment

BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, Issue 4 2007
Hyun-Jung Lee
This study explores the extent to which gender dissimilarity in the workplace affects employees' commitment to their organization, using data from the British (1998) Workplace Employee Relations Survey. The results showed that the effects of organizational-level gender dissimilarity on organizational commitment were more complex than has commonly been assumed in the literature. The relationship between organizational-level gender dissimilarity and employee commitment was U-shaped for women whereas it was not significant for men. The relationship was moderated by the respondents' status as measured by their level of pay. For men, the relationship between gender dissimilarity and commitment was negative for high-paid individuals but not for low-paid ones, while for women the U-shaped relationship was weaker for high-paid individuals than for low-paid individuals. [source]


Does Union Membership Really Reduce Job Satisfaction?

BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, Issue 3 2004
Alex Bryson
We investigate the effect of union membership on job satisfaction. Using linked employer,employee data from the 1998 British Workplace Employee Relations Survey, we analyse the relationship between the membership decision and overall job satisfaction and satisfaction with pay. In this paper we account for the endogenous selection induced by the sorting of workers into unionized jobs. Controlling for both individual and establishment heterogeneity and explicitly modelling the effect of union status, we find that the marked difference in job satisfaction between unionized and non-unionized workers disappears, suggesting that a selection effect, rather than a causal effect, characterizes the relationship. [source]


Workplace Risk, Establishment Size and Union Density

BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, Issue 3 2004
Paul Fenn
The health and safety risk faced by individual employees can be treated as an unobservable latent variable which manifests itself at workplace level through reported counts of work-related injuries and illnesses over a given interval. This paper presents results from count data regressions using data from the 1998 Workplace Employee Relations Survey. The findings strongly support the view that employees in larger establishments have a lower probability of being injured or falling ill. In addition, establishments with a higher proportion of unionized employees, and with health and safety committees, were associated with higher numbers of reported injuries and illnesses. [source]


Updating the Determinants of Firm Performance: Estimation using the 1998 UK Workplace Employee Relations Survey

BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, Issue 3 2001
John T. Addison
We examine the determinants of establishment performance in the UK, using cross-sectional data from the 1998 Workplace Employee Relations Survey to replicate research by Fernie and Metcalf (1995) who used data from the 1990 Workplace Employee Relations Survey; specifically, we test whether employee representation, contingent pay and efforts to boost employee participation affect a set of economic and industrial relations outcome indicators in the manner they suggest. We also re-estimate the influential WERS90-based study of Machin and Stewart (1996) on the links between union status and financial performance. In both cases we report very different results. [source]


The 1998 Workplace Employee Relations Survey

BRITISH JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, Issue 4 2000
Article first published online: 16 DEC 200
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