Strategy Formulation (strategy + formulation)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


A multi-agent-based hybrid framework for international marketing planning under uncertainty

INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS IN ACCOUNTING, FINANCE & MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2009
Shuliang Li
The increased complexity and competition in the global marketing environment present new challenges to decision-makers. The characteristics of the international marketing planning problem are clarified in this paper. The advantages and disadvantages of relevant techniques and technologies that may be applied to deal with the planning problem are analysed. A multi-agent-based hybrid intelligent framework for international marketing planning and associated Internet strategy formulation is then established, with underlying techniques, technologies, software architecture and integration method outlined. In addition, a software prototype of the hybrid framework, called AgentsInternational, is created and presented, with initial evaluation results reported. Further work on this topic is also planned. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Auditing the strategic role of operations

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT REVIEWS, Issue 3 2007
Bob Lillis
The literature relating to auditing the strategic role and contribution of operations has been dominated by methodologies attuned to the predominance of the environmental and competitive forces, and entry deterrence approaches to achieving and sustaining competitive advantage, broadly termed the outside-in perspective. However, tools suited to the resource-based and associated dynamic capability view to strategy formulation, deemed the inside-out perspective, are sparse. This paper makes a contribution to furthering understanding of the auditing of the strategic role and contribution of operations by conducting a review and critique of established ideas, practices and approaches from both strategy formulation perspectives. It argues that the reported methodologies reflect the traditional outside-in perspective to strategy formulation. It highlights the limitations of the available tools for an inside-out view and questions the suitability of the existing methods to the more recent inside-out emphasis, also a factor vital in circumstances where a firm typically is pursuing a combination or blend of the outside-in and inside-out approaches to strategy formulation. Finally, it presents the outline of an additional audit tool designed to address these limitations and describes next steps in future research. [source]


A performance measurement paradigm for integrating strategy formulation: A review of systems and frameworks

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT REVIEWS, Issue 1 2005
Kit Fai Pun
Measuring organizational performance plays a very important part in translating corporate strategy into results. Various emerging (non-traditional) performance systems have recently been devised to aid firms in selecting and implementing measures. This paper discusses the strategy/measurement initiatives and compares ten emerging performance measurement systems with respect to a list of performance dimensions, the characteristics of performance measures, and the requirements of development process. Although these systems have constraints borne with their own application domains, they stand by themselves empirically and/or theoretically, and provide guidance about what to measure and how to design performance measures that could be linked to the corporate strategy and objectives of an organization. This paper concludes that there is a need to develop a paradigm for integrating strategy formulation and performance measurement in organizations. [source]


Capacity Planning in a Transitional Setting with Simulation-based Modeling: A Case Study

INTERNATIONAL TRANSACTIONS IN OPERATIONAL RESEARCH, Issue 2 2002
Christoph Haehling Von Lanzenauer
Significant progress has been made in the development of modeling and analysis frameworks for the purpose of supporting senior executives in their task of strategy formulation and evaluation. Using the case study British Synthetic Fibres Ltd, the important strategic task of capacity planning is addressed in a transitional setting. The paper illustrates the use of influence diagrams, the development of a spreadsheet model in a language facilitating easy communication with senior management, and the strength of risk analysis as effective tools for managing the capacity-planning process. Special emphasis is placed on the benefits and insights to be gained from this approach in evaluating strategic options in the context of the case study. [source]


Evidence-based practice in search interface design

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 6 2006
Barbara M. Wildemuth
An evidence-based practice approach to search interface design is proposed, with the goal of designing interfaces that adequately support search strategy formulation and reformulation. Relevant findings from studies of information professionals' searching behaviors, end users' searching of bibliographic databases, and search behaviors on the Web are highlighted. Three brief examples are presented to illustrate the ways in which findings from such studies can be used to make decisions about the design of search interfaces. If academic research can be effectively connected with design practice, we can discover which design practices truly are "best practices" and incorporate them into future search interfaces. [source]


Firm strategy, innovation and consumer demand: a market process approach

MANAGERIAL AND DECISION ECONOMICS, Issue 4-5 2001
Paul L. Robertson
Despite recent advances by economists such as Porter and those associated with the resource-based school, the economics of demand rarely features in discussions of business strategy. Porter and the resource-based school take the characteristics of demand as given, and place almost exclusive emphasis on the role of supply-side factors in formulating strategy. Scholars in strategic marketing, by contrast, recognize the importance of demand factors, but do not analyse them from an economic standpoint. Moreover, none of the important schools of strategic management attempts to explore the relationship between supply and demand in much analytical depth. In this paper, we adopt a market process approach to strategy formulation as a preliminary step towards rectifying these problems. First, we explore the factors that affect the economics of demand, particularly in innovative situations. Second, we adapt Lancaster's attribute analysis to show how the interaction between supply and demand can be represented from a market process perspective. On the basis of our efforts, we conclude that further work in these areas would benefit students of both strategic management and economics. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


STRATEGY, STRUCTURE AND PROCESS IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR: A TEST OF THE MILES AND SNOW MODEL

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION, Issue 4 2009
RHYS ANDREWS
We present a comprehensive empirical application of the Miles and Snow (1978) model of organizational strategy, structure and process to the public sector. We refine the model by distinguishing between strategy formulation and implementation, and applying it to 90 public service organizations. Although the empirical evidence shows that organizational strategies fit the Miles and Snow categories of prospector, defender and reactor, the relationship between these strategies and organizational structures (for example, centralization) and processes (for example, planning) is less consistent with their model. Conclusions are drawn for public management theory and practice. [source]


The Performance Impact of Content and Process in Product Innovation Charters

THE JOURNAL OF PRODUCT INNOVATION MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2007
Chris Bart
The significance of product innovation charters (PICs) cannot be overemphasized, as they provide understanding and a tool for setting organizational goals, charting strategic direction, and allocating resources for new product portfolios. In a unique way, a PIC represents a sort of mission statement mutation for new products. With the backdrop of strategy formulation and product innovation literatures, this article investigates the impact of both content specificity within PICs and satisfaction with the PIC formulation process on new product performance in North American corporations. A survey was undertaken among executives knowledgeable about their organization's new product development process. The respondents included chief executive officers, vice presidents, directors, and managers. The findings demonstrate that significant differences exist both in PIC content specificity and process satisfaction between highly innovative and low innovative firms. The study also shows that PIC specificity in terms of the factors mission content and strategic directives positively influences new product performance. Further, the study demonstrates that satisfaction with the process of formulating PICs plays a positive and powerful mediating role in the PIC specificity,performance relationship. The results suggest that product innovation charters, like their mission statement cousins, may be of more value than most managers realize. The study shows that achieving a state of organizational satisfaction with a PIC's formulation process is critical for obtaining better new product performance. Directions for future research also are suggested. [source]