Solidarity

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Humanities and Social Sciences

Kinds of Solidarity

  • family solidarity
  • social solidarity


  • Selected Abstracts


    Solidarity and Difference: A Contemporary Reading of Paul's Ethics

    CONVERSATIONS IN RELIGION & THEOLOGY, Issue 1 2006
    Article first published online: 24 APR 200
    Books reviewed: Solidarity and Difference: A Contemporary Reading of Paul's Ethics, David G. Horrell Reviewed by Leslie Houlden Temple Balsall, UK Response to Leslie Houlden By David G. Horrell University of Exeter, UK [source]


    Embodying Gender, Work and Organization: Solidarity, Cool Loyalties and Contested Hierarchy in a Masculinist Occupation

    GENDER, WORK & ORGANISATION, Issue 5 2002
    Lee F. MonaghanArticle first published online: 21 MAY 200
    Despite a ,somatic turn' in the social sciences, there remains a dearth of theoretically informed research on male working bodies, the embodied doings of masculinities independent of biological sex and intra,gendered workplace relations. This is unfortunate because embodiment is thoroughly implicated in major social divisions, including gender domination in institutional contexts. Using an embodied sociological perspective and data generated during an ethnography of British nightclub and pub security work, this article goes some way towards embodying the social study of plural masculinities, work and organization. Exploring worker solidarity, cool loyalties and contested hierarchy in this risky masculinist occupation hopefully makes several contributions to the literature. Furthering the (theoretically informed) empirical study of masculinities and socially embedded bodies, the article sensitizes other researchers to gendered/embodied processes possibly taking a more diluted form in other work settings. [source]


    The Future of Regions: Why the Competitiveness Imperative Should not Prevail over Solidarity, Sustainability and Democracy

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 2 2000
    Riccardo Petrella
    The thesis here submitted for debate and criticism is as follows: if today's governing principles that inspire policy choices and priority setting in our societies (which claim to be "knowledge- based societies") are to remain in place in the course of the coming five to ten years, the relative position of the less developed regions (and cities) vis-à-vis the most developed ones will again deteriorate, even though per capita real purchasing power might also slightly increase in the less developed regions. The if-hypothesis, however, is not the only possible pattern of future developments. Because present economic and political leaders are, in general, the promoters and supporters of today's predominant principles, the only way to make possible alternative future developments based on solidarity, sustainability and democracy is that citizens themselves take the initiative, locally and globally, to modify present practices and define new goals and new priorities. In consideration of the results obtained in recent years by civil social movements and protests, one may reasonably consider it as a possible scenario. [source]


    The Unemployed and the Question of Solidarity

    GERMAN RESEARCH, Issue 2 2003
    Silke Hamann Dipl.
    Rampant mass unemployment and the discussion about the future of social security raises many questions. A study examines to what extent social welfare benefits are accepted amongst the population [source]


    BOOK REVIEWS: Political Solidarity.

    HYPATIA, Issue 1 2010
    By SALLY SCHOLZ, Democracy, the Political Unconscious.
    First page of article [source]


    Solidarity towards immigrants in European welfare states

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WELFARE, Issue 1 2008
    Wim Van Oorschot
    The concern that immigration could threaten the sustainability of the European Social Model is a reason to have a closer look at popular images of immigrants in the context of European welfare states. The focus is on Europeans' informal solidarity towards immigrants relative to other vulnerable groups in society. Using data from the European Values Survey 1999/2000 we find that in all European countries the public is least solidaristic towards migrants, in comparison with elderly people, sick and disabled people and unemployed people. Contrary to expectation, there is little relation between welfare state characteristics and people's solidarity, while the relative solidarity towards immigrants is higher in culturally more diverse countries. As expected, the relative solidarity towards immigrants is lower in countries with a more negative opinion climate towards immigrants and in poorer countries of Europe. [source]


    Guest Editorial: Solidarity and welfare transition

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WELFARE, Issue 4 2000
    Mats Thorslund
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Solidarity put to the test.

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SOCIAL WELFARE, Issue 4 2000
    Health, social care in the UK
    As welfare states experience challenges from ideological and funding sources, the position of the United Kingdom represents an important case study. Apparently under severe attack for its perceived failures to deliver efficiency, effectiveness and social justice, there remains a continued high level of public support for `nationalised' health and social care. The paper explores the nature of the fissures in the systems and the data which indicates enduring solidarity. [source]


    The Downside of Solidarity

    INTERNATIONAL STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 1 2007
    DAVID D. LAITIN
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    2007 Presidential Address: Singing and Solidarity

    JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF RELIGION, Issue 2 2008
    R. STEPHEN WARNER
    As the audience entered the hall, a large screen displayed the title of the talk from an overhead projector. On the dais, about three feet above the floor, was a lectern, and next to it an arrangement of eight chairs facing each other in a square formation, two on each side of the square, the sides at a 45 degree angle from the side of the platform. At the appointed time, SSSR past-president Donald Miller climbed the steps to the lectern to introduce the speaker, Stephen Warner. When he had completed that task, Warner came forward to the lectern and a woman later identified as his wife, Anne Heider, began working the projector. A few minutes into the address, at Warner's cue, she and six others joined him on the dais, taking seats in the arrangement of chairs, from which position, facing each other with Warner standing facing toward them, they sang a song, as described below. When they were finished, they left the dais, and the rest of the address proceeded in a conventional manner. Prior to this singing demonstration, the address itself began as follows. [source]


    The Effect of Later Life Parental Divorce on Adult-Child/Older-Parent Solidarity: A Test of the Buffering Hypothesis,

    JOURNAL OF APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 6 2003
    Paul A. Nakonezny
    The present study examined the effect of later life parental divorce on solidarity in the relationship between the adult child and older parent. This examination was achieved by testing the buffering hypothesis. A cross-sectional quasiexperimental pre-post treatment design was used (Cook & Campbell, 1979), with retrospective pretests and data from 100 adult-child/older-parent dyads. The ANOVA results show that the mother/adult-child relationship with a higher degree of predivorce solidarity responded to later life parental divorce with less disruption of affectional solidarity and associational solidarity than those with a lower degree of predivorce solidarity. Thus, the current research provides modest evidence (for the mother/adult-child relationship) to support the buffering hypothesis. We found no evidence of a buffering effect for the father-child relationship. [source]


    ECOWAS: Crisis Requires Solidarity

    AFRICA RESEARCH BULLETIN: ECONOMIC, FINANCIAL AND TECHNICAL SERIES, Issue 5 2009
    Article first published online: 3 JUL 200
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Regulation and Social Solidarity

    JOURNAL OF LAW AND SOCIETY, Issue 3 2006
    Tony Prosser
    Justifications for regulation are commonly based on the identification of market failures. This is however inadequate to account for much regulation, and sees regulation as inherently second best to market allocations. This article argues that, although some regulation will be based on market failure, other justifications can be found in the protection of rights and in the maintenance of social solidarity. Theoretical support for this last rationale can be found in the work of Durkheim and Duguit and the concept of public service. To accept this rationale for regulation has important implications both for regulatory policies and regulatory instruments. [source]


    Solidarity and Conflict Between Adult Children and Parents: A Latent Class Analysis

    JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 4 2006
    Ruben I. Van Gaalen
    Using multiple dimensions of solidarity and conflict in a latent class analysis, we develop a typology of adult child,parent relationships. The data (N= 4,990) are from the first wave of the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study. In descending order of relationship quality, the 5 types are harmonious (akin to relationships with friends), ambivalent (intensive exchange of material support accompanied by strain), obligatory (just keeping in touch), affective (emotionally supportive with few other meaningful exchanges), and discordant (predominantly negative engagement). The types are differentiated by gender, age, family size, geographic distance, and parental marital history, indicating that they are not fixed but are shaped by social-structural conditions. [source]


    Solidarity, Conflict, and Ambivalence: Complementary or Competing Perspectives on Intergenerational Relationships?

    JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 3 2002
    Vern Bengtson
    First page of article [source]


    Solidarity and Probabilistic Target Rules

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC ECONOMIC THEORY, Issue 2 2001
    Lars Ehlers
    We consider a probabilistic approach to collective choice problems where a group of agents with single-peaked preferences have to decide on the level or location of a public good. We show that every probabilistic rule that satisfies Pareto efficiency and "solidarity" (population-monotonicity or replacement-domination) must equal a so-called target rule. [source]


    Solidarity and the Common Good: An Analytic Framework

    JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY, Issue 1 2007
    William Rehg
    First page of article [source]


    Solidarity and Subsidiarity: Complementary Principles of Community Development

    JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY, Issue 1 2002
    Francis J. Schweigert
    [source]


    Normalizing bilingualism:The effects of the Catalonian linguistic normalization policy one generation after1

    JOURNAL OF SOCIOLINGUISTICS, Issue 3 2008
    Michael Newman
    This study examines the evolution of language attitudes of linguistically diverse adolescents in urban Catalonia a generation after the instauration of Linguistic Normalization, official language policies favoring Catalan. Woolard (1984, 1989) and Woolard and Gahng's (1990) classic Catalan/Spanish matched guise studies are used as a baseline. Current data come from a modified and expanded replication of those original studies. Findings show: (1) differences in attitudes between youths of Spanish and Catalan background have softened; (2) disparities in Status and Solidarity have evened out; (3) language choice can be highly gendered; and (4) bilingual proficiency is now valued by and for both communities. The support for bilingualism and the easing of divisions are understood as signs of increased ,linguistic cosmopolitanism,' a stance that looks beyond parochial own-group communities and favors bridging linguistic boundaries. The significance is that minority languages can be valued when they take on such symbolic roles. [source]


    Feminism without Borders: Decolonizing Theory, Practicing Solidarity

    AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST, Issue 3 2004
    CATHERINE ESCHLE
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    How can Rorty help nursing science in the development of a philosophical ,foundation'?

    NURSING PHILOSOPHY, Issue 2 2009
    Sandy Isaacs BScN MSc RN
    Abstract What can nurse scientists learn from Rorty in the development of a philosophical foundation? Indeed, Rorty in his 1989 text entitled Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity tantalizes the reader with debates of reason ,against' philosophizing. Forget truth seeking; move on to what matters. Rorty would rather the ,high brow' thinking go to those that do the work in order to make the effort useful. Nursing as an applied science, has something real that is worth looking at, and that nurse researchers need to think about. And as a profession built upon relationships, we should be thinking of the exchanges we have with those around us, of the contrasts in vocabularies used and of the contingencies involved, letting this launch us into our imaginings and areas of enquiry. The business of nurse researchers is to study what nurses do , how we care; Rorty would have us care. But, not to dismiss the reflective thinker as Rorty advocates for the self-doubting ironist to continue to seek the final vocabulary, the ideal of what ,this' means, accepting this as the best to be offered at the time. As a science struggling to find foundation, we need only to look at what we do and value , as antifoundational as Rorty portrays himself, Rorty ,ironically' may have revealed a foundation for nursing science that is consistent with its path. [source]


    Beyond Material Explanations: Family Solidarity and Mortality, a Small Area-level Analysis

    POPULATION AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW, Issue 1 2010
    Jon Anson
    Social solidarity, being embedded in a network of binding social relationships, tends to extend human longevity. Yet while average incomes in the Western world, and with them, life expectancies, have risen dramatically, the second demographic transition has occasioned a breakdown in traditional family forms. This article considers whether these trends in family life may have slowed the rise in life expectancy. I present a cross-sectional analysis of Israeli statistical areas (SAs), for which I construct indexes of Standard of Living (SOL), Traditional Family Structure (TFS), and Religiosity (R). I show that (1) increases in all three of these indexes are associated with lower levels of mortality, (2) male mortality is more sensitive to differences in SOL and TFS than is female mortality, and (3) net of differences in SOL and TFS, there is no difference in the mortality levels of Arab and Jewish populations. [source]


    Friendship, Identity, and Solidarity.

    RATIO JURIS, Issue 3 2003
    An Approach to Rights in Plant Closing Cases
    My focus is on the problem of plant closings, which have become increasingly common as the deindustrialization of America has proceeded since the early 1980s. In a well-known article, Joseph William Singer proposed that workers who sued to keep a plant open in the face of a planned closure might appropriately be regarded as possessing a reliance-based interest in the plant that merited some protection. I seek to extend this sort of argument in two ways. In the first half of the paper, I point to the way in which "tacit obligation" emerges in friendship between persons in the absence of explicit commitments. Employers and employees are of course not as such friends. But I argue that the development of tacit obligations binding friends provides a useful analogy for understanding the growth of similar tacit obligations binding plant owners to workers and local communities. In the second half, I draw on Margaret Radin's work on property and identity to ground a related argument. I suggest that the potential contribution of plants,and the traditions and networks of relationships they help to create and sustain,to the identities of workers and communities provides reason for at least some legal protection of employee and community interests. [source]


    Solidarity Perfected: Beneficent Christology in the Epistle to the Hebrews , By Kevin B. McCruden

    RELIGIOUS STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 2 2010
    Alan C. Mitchell
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Justice Education: From Service to Solidarity , By Suzanne C. Toton

    RELIGIOUS STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 4 2008
    Pamela K. Brubaker
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    The Broken Whole: Philosophical Steps Toward a Theology of Global Solidarity , By Thomas E. Reynolds

    RELIGIOUS STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 1 2007
    Amos Yong
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Solidarity and Difference: A Contemporary Reading of Paul's Ethics , David G. Horrell

    RELIGIOUS STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 3 2006
    Casimir Bernas
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Buddhists and Christians: Through Comparative Theology to Solidarity , James L. Fredericks

    RELIGIOUS STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 2 2006
    Wendy Farley
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    The Concept of Solidarity: Emerging from the Theoretical Shadows?

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF POLITICS & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, Issue 1 2007
    Lawrence Wilde
    The concept of solidarity has been relatively neglected by social scientists since Durkheim's pioneering work in the late 19th century. The discipline of politics has been guilty of overlooking this ,subjective' element of community life, but recent works by Stjernĝ and Brunkhorst reflect a growing awareness of the theoretical significance of the concept. Whereas early liberal attempts to theorise solidarity took the nation state to be the appropriate community for its realisation, the emergence of globalisation raises the possibility of human solidarity developing in the global community. Traditional forms of solidarity have been dissipated by the social changes accompanying globalisation, but they were often locked into the defence of particular interests. New forms may be emerging to rekindle the broader vision of human solidarity. Recent work by writers such as Habermas, Honneth, Rorty and Touraine focuses on widening and deepening democratic participation and/or the articulation of our ethical obligations in various ways. It is argued here that these perspectives need to be supplemented by a radical humanist approach grounded in a normative theory of human self-realisation. [source]


    Trajectories of Solidarity: Changing Union-party Linkages in The UK and The USA

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF POLITICS & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, Issue 2 2002
    Steve Ludlam
    This article analyses the linkage between trade unions and the US Democratic Party and the UK Labour Party in the twentieth century. A typology suited to longitudinal analysis of labour movement union-party linkages is proposed to help characterise and explain his-torical development of these two national movements through earlier types of linkage, into ,New Labour' and ,New Democratic' forms. The paper suggests that, from similar starting points, differences through time in the range of types of linkage in the two movements can be explained by a combination of factors of political economy and electoral strategy, a combination that today points towards weaker relationships. [source]