Societal Issues (societal + issues)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Incorporation of ethical and societal issues in biochemistry into a senior seminar course

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY EDUCATION, Issue 5 2003
Mary Lou Caspers
Abstract In their senior year, biochemistry majors at the University of Detroit Mercy take a senior seminar course entitled "Recent Advances in Biochemistry Related to Societal Issues." Students read papers selected from the current literature and take turns presenting these papers to the class. Papers are grouped into units dealing with molecular biology, protein structure/function, apoptosis/cancer/AIDS, and neurochemistry. The ethical/societal implications of the research are also discussed. In addition, a term paper dealing with societal issues and written in dialogue format by teams of students is required. The students present their dialogue papers as skits to an audience composed of faculty as well as junior biochemistry, chemistry, and biology majors. Based upon a survey taken at the beginning, at midterm, and at the end of the semester, the familiarity of the students with the ethical/societal issues related to the subjects covered increased significantly. Also, in course evaluations administered at the end of the semester, students expressed a high degree of satisfaction with this course. [source]


Rethinking the interface between ecology and society.

JOURNAL OF APPLIED ECOLOGY, Issue 1 2008
The case of the cockle controversy in the Dutch Wadden Sea
Summary 1Applied ecology, like conservation research, may deal with societal issues if its scientifically based interventions have societal consequences. Human utilization plays a significant role in many ecosystems, so conservation ecologists often have to act on the interface between science and society, where controversies may arise. 2Using insights from science and technology studies, we have analysed the 15-year controversy on the ecological effects of cockle fishing in the Dutch Wadden Sea, which began around 1990 and involved nature protection and shellfish organizations, as well as several leading Dutch ecologists, in a heated debate. 3During this controversy, evaluative research on the ecological effects of cockle fishing was undertaken by a consortium of institutes in order to contribute to the process of political decision-making by the Dutch government on cockle fishery in this area. In addition to conservational and commercial interests, ecological research itself became part of the controversy. 4The research projects on the effects of cockle fishing during this controversy are examples of societally contextualized science, implying that interests and societal disputes are intertwined with scientific arguments. We have applied a dynamic model of contextualization in which societal stakes and scientific uncertainty are considered as the main factors determining the different contexts in which conservation research functions. 5Synthesis and applications. Conservation research, whether it is fundamental or managerially orientated, is related to greater societal aims and interests and might easily face more or less complex societally contextualized situations. Such situations imply extended responsibilities for scientists. Not only is there a need for sound science, but also for a sound way of interacting and communicating with the societal environment. Some elements of such a notion of extended accountability are presented. [source]


Developing the changes in attitude about the relevance of science (CARS) questionnaire and assessing two high school science classes

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 8 2003
Marcelle A. Siegel
This study has two purposes: (a) methodological,to design and test a new instrument able to reflect changes in attitudes toward science over time, and (b) investigative,to find out the effect of two similar curricular treatments on the attitudes of two classes. Items about the relevance of science to students' lives were developed, pilot-tested, and analyzed using Rasch modeling. We then divided reliable items into three equivalent questionnaire forms. The final three forms of the questionnaire were used to assess high school students' attitudes. Over 18 weeks, one class used a core curriculum (Science and Sustainability) to learn science in the context of making decisions about societal issues. A second class used the same core curriculum, but with parts replaced by computer-based activities (Convince Me) designed to enhance the coherence of students' arguments. Using traditional and Rasch modeling techniques, we assessed the degrees to which such instructional activities promoted students' beliefs that science is relevant to them. Both classes tended to agree more, over time, that science is relevant to their lives, and the increases were statistically equivalent between classes. This study suggests that, by using innovative, issue-based activities, it is possible to enhance students' attitudes about the relevance of science. 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 40: 757,775, 2003 [source]


Family History as National History: Peter Henisch's Novel Die kleine Figur meines Vaters and the Issue of Memory in Austria's Second Republic

ORBIS LITERARUM, Issue 2 2004
Anthony Bushell
This article examines an early but key text in Austria's belated examination of its citizens' role in the Third Reich. It shows how Peter Henisch's novel exposed unresolved generational conflicts within a prosperous and stable post-war Austrian society and how the text provided an example of the discussion of uncomfortable societal issues in post-war Austria through the intimate sphere of family life. Simultaneously, the book reflected upon the limitations and distortions inherent in all creative works of art, distortions that Henisch shows are present in the very process of remembering. Crucially, the work continues to invite the reader to associate the integrity of national memory with the integrity of private memory. [source]


Association of Community Health Nursing Educators: Disaster Preparedness White Paper for Community/Public Health Nursing Educators

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING, Issue 4 2008
Sandra W. Kuntz
ABSTRACT The Association of Community Health Nursing Educators (ACHNE) has developed a number of documents designed to delineate the scope and function of community/public health nursing educators, researchers, and practitioners. In response to societal issues, increased emphasis on disaster preparedness in nursing and public health, and requests from partner organizations to contribute to curriculum development endeavors regarding disaster preparedness, the ACHNE Disaster Preparedness Task Force was appointed in spring 2007 for the purpose of developing this document. Task Force members developed a draft of the document in summer and fall 2007, input was solicited and received from ACHNE members in fall 2007, and the document was approved and published in January 2008. The members of ACHNE extend their appreciation to the members of the Emergency Preparedness Task Force for their efforts: Pam Frable, N.D., R.N.; Sandra Kuntz, Ph.D., C.N.S.-B.C. (Chair); Kristine Qureshi, D.N.Sc., C.E.N., R.N.; Linda Strong, Ed.D., R.N. This white paper is aimed at meeting the needs of community/public health nursing educators and clarifying issues for the nursing and public health communities. ACHNE is committed to promotion of the public's health through ensuring leadership and excellence in community and public health nursing education, research, and practice. [source]


Incorporation of ethical and societal issues in biochemistry into a senior seminar course

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY EDUCATION, Issue 5 2003
Mary Lou Caspers
Abstract In their senior year, biochemistry majors at the University of Detroit Mercy take a senior seminar course entitled "Recent Advances in Biochemistry Related to Societal Issues." Students read papers selected from the current literature and take turns presenting these papers to the class. Papers are grouped into units dealing with molecular biology, protein structure/function, apoptosis/cancer/AIDS, and neurochemistry. The ethical/societal implications of the research are also discussed. In addition, a term paper dealing with societal issues and written in dialogue format by teams of students is required. The students present their dialogue papers as skits to an audience composed of faculty as well as junior biochemistry, chemistry, and biology majors. Based upon a survey taken at the beginning, at midterm, and at the end of the semester, the familiarity of the students with the ethical/societal issues related to the subjects covered increased significantly. Also, in course evaluations administered at the end of the semester, students expressed a high degree of satisfaction with this course. [source]


Future societal issues in industrial biotechnology

BIOTECHNOLOGY JOURNAL, Issue 9 2007
Daan Schuurbiers
Abstract Three international stakeholder meetings were organized by the Netherlands-based "Kluyver Center for Genomics of Industrial Fermentation" with the objective to identify the future societal issues in the field of industrial biotechnology and to develop a coordinated strategy for public dialogue. The meetings resulted in five unanimous recommendations: (i) that science, industry and the European Commission in conjunction with other stakeholders create a comprehensive roadmap towards a bio-based economy; (ii) that the European Commission initiate a series of round-table meetings to further articulate the views, interests and responsibilities of the relevant stakeholders and to define policy; (iii) that the development of new innovative communication activities is stimulated to increase public engagement and to discuss the ways that we do or do not want technologies to shape our common future; (iv) that further social studies are undertaken on public attitudes and behaviors to the bio-based economy and that novel methods are developed to assess public views of future technological developments; and (v) that the concept of sustainability is further operationalized and taken as a core value driving research and development and policy making. [source]