Sesquiterpene Hydrocarbons (sesquiterpene + hydrocarbon)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


ChemInform Abstract: Regiospecific Synthesis of a New Chiral N-Substituted Pyrazole Using a Sesquiterpene Hydrocarbon.

CHEMINFORM, Issue 32 2002
A. Auhmani
Abstract ChemInform is a weekly Abstracting Service, delivering concise information at a glance that was extracted from about 100 leading journals. To access a ChemInform Abstract of an article which was published elsewhere, please select a "Full Text" option. The original article is trackable via the "References" option. [source]


Three Sesquiterpene Hydrocarbons from the Roots of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae)

CHEMINFORM, Issue 18 2006
Rita Richter
Abstract ChemInform is a weekly Abstracting Service, delivering concise information at a glance that was extracted from about 200 leading journals. To access a ChemInform Abstract, please click on HTML or PDF. [source]


ChemInform Abstract: Sesquiterpene Hydrocarbons with Trifarane Backbone in the Liverwort Trocholejeunea sandvicensis.

CHEMINFORM, Issue 49 2001
Mesmin Mekem Sonwa
Abstract ChemInform is a weekly Abstracting Service, delivering concise information at a glance that was extracted from about 100 leading journals. To access a ChemInform Abstract of an article which was published elsewhere, please select a "Full Text" option. The original article is trackable via the "References" option. [source]


Volatile constituents of the flowerheads of three Echinacea species cultivated in Iran

FLAVOUR AND FRAGRANCE JOURNAL, Issue 2 2006
Mohammad Hossein Mirjalili
Abstract Three medicinal species of the genus Echinacea (Asteraceae), i.e. E. purpurea, E. pallida and E. angustifolia, were cultivated in the experimental field of the Medicinal Plants and Drugs Research Institute of Shahid Beheshti University (Tehran, Iran). The essential oil of flowerheads of the studied species was isolated by hydrodistillation. The essential oils were analyzed by GC and GC-MS. In total, 36, 30 and 36 constituents were identified and quantified in E. purpurea, E. pallida and E. angustifolia, respectively. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons were the main group of compounds in E. purpurea (70.9%), E. angustifolia (70%) and E. pallida (62.6%). The content of germacrene-D in E. purpurea (57%) was higher than that in E. pallida (51.4%) and E. angustifolia (49.6%) as the principal component in all samples. Also, the monoterpene hydrocarbons were observed in the oil of E. purpurea (6.4%) and E. angustifolia (1.2%), while these compounds were completely absent in E. pallida oil. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Composition of the essential oil of Teucrium ramosissimum Desf. (Lamiaceae) from Tunisia

FLAVOUR AND FRAGRANCE JOURNAL, Issue 2 2007
Souleima F. Hachicha
Abstract The essential oil from aerial parts of Teucrium ramosissimum Desf. (Lamiaceae), endemic to North Africa, was isolated by steam distillation and analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography,mass spectrometry (GC,MS). Seventy-four components were identified; the essential oil was mainly composed of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated sesquiterpenes at nearly the same amounts (41.9% and 42.3%, respectively). , -Cadinene (19.97%), , -cadinol (9.93%) and germacradien-4- , -1-ol (8.68%) were the major compounds. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Flavour volatiles of flowers and stalks of Murraya koenigii L.

FLAVOUR AND FRAGRANCE JOURNAL, Issue 4 2006
S. G. Walde
Abstract The volatiles of fresh leaf stalks and flowers of Murraya koenigii (curry leaf plant), grown in Hyderabad, India, were isolated by simultaneous distillation and extraction method and analysed by GC,MS. Thirty-one components were identified in the leaf stalk oil, constituting 88.1% of the volatile oil. The major components were the mono- and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (66.7%), of which the major ones were , -pinene (24.2%), , -pinene (6.9%), , -phellandrene (7.3%) and , -copaene (8.9%). In addition, the oil had nine oxygenated monoterpenes (14.2%) and four sesquiterpene alcohols (8.1%). In the flower oil, 24 components were identified, constituting 91.8% of the volatile oil. Here, too, the major constituents were mono- and sesquiterpenes (87%), of which cis -ocimene (34.1%), , -pinene (19.1%), , -terpinene (6.7%) and , -caryophyllene (9.5%) were predominant. It also contained seven oxygenated monoterpenes and three oxygenated sesquiterpenes, constituting 4.7% of the oil. The larger number of oxygenated mono- and sesquiterpenes present appear to be responsible for the intense odour associated with the stalk and flower parts of Murraya koenigii as compared to the leaf. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Variation in essential oil composition of rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium sp.) distilled by different distillation techniques,

FLAVOUR AND FRAGRANCE JOURNAL, Issue 2 2005
Kiran G. D. Babu
Abstract The rose-scented geranium (Pelargonium sp.) cultivar ,Kelkar', grown in the agroclimatic conditions of the western Himalayas, was processed by various hydrodistillation methods, which revealed that water distillation of the herb gave a higher oil yield (0.16,0.22%) than the water,steam distillation (0.09,0.12%) and steam distillation methods (0.06,0.18%). The samples were analysed by GC and GC,MS to study and compare the essential oil compositions which revealed that the oil distilled by the water,steam distillation method contained a higher content of monoterpene hydrocarbons (1.7%), followed by steam distillation without cohobation and without recycling (1.5%). A higher content of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (4.4%) was found in cumulative oil followed by ,direct oil' (4.2%) obtained by steam distillation with cohobation and without recycling of hydrosol, followed by the water,steam distillation method (3.4%). ,Decanted oil', recovered from redistilling the hydrosol obtained by steam distillation with cohobation and without recycling, contained maximum monoterpene cyclic ethers (1.1%) and carbonyl content (9.9%), closely followed by water,steam distillation method (1.1% and 7.2%, respectively). Steam distillation without cohobation and without recycling of hydrosol yielded essential oil with a higher percentage of esters (21.1%), followed by ,direct oil' (16.6%). Lower ester content (5.3%) was noticed in ,decanted oil', followed by oil distilled by steam distillation with cohobation and with recycling (11.8%) and oil distilled in a Clevenger apparatus by the water distillation method (12.2%), whereas maximum total alcohols were found in the ,decanted oil' (75.1%), followed by oil from the Clevenger apparatus (72.8%) and steam distillation with cohobation and with recycling (69.1%). A lower alcohol content was found in the ,direct oil' (55.2%) closely followed by ,cumulative oil' (55.8%). The variation in total alcohol and ester contents in geranium oil samples, distilled by using different processing techniques on pilot scale distillation, is mainly due to hydrolysis of some volatile constituents. This was further supported by acid values of the oils, along with other physicochemical properties, such as speci,c gravity, optical rotation, refractive index, solubility in alcohol, ester value with cold and hot methods, estimation of ester content as geranyl formate and geranyl tiglate, ester number after acetylation, and ester number after formylation with aceto-formic acid and formic acid. Methods have been standardized and proposed for distillations of speci,c quality, e.g. ester-rich and alcohol-rich geranium oils, to meet different requirements of the industry. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Essential oil composition of Turkish herbal tea (Salvia aucheri Bentham var. canescens Boiss.

FLAVOUR AND FRAGRANCE JOURNAL, Issue 4 2003
& Heldr.)
Abstract The essential oil of the aerial parts of Salvia aucheri var. canescens, collected from two different locations (Gülnar, sample A; and Silifke, sample B) growing endemic in Turkey, were analysed by GC,MS. The oil yields of dried plants (v/dw) obtained by hydrodistillation were 1.4% and 1.7%, respectively. Forty-two compounds were identi,ed, representing 98.6% and 99.5% of the oils from the two locations. The main constituents of the oils were: 1,8-cineole (32.3%, 28.6%), camphor (18.9%, 22.8%), borneol (8.2%, 8.9%), , -pinene (6.3%, 9.0%) and , -pinene (5.3%, 6.2%), respectively. The oils consisted of monoterpenic hydrocarbons (21.3%, 27.4%), oxygenated monoterpenes (66.4%, 64.9%), sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (6.3%, 3.1%) and oxygenated sesquiterpenes (4.1%, 4.1%), respectively. 1,8-Cineole and camphor were the major components of S. aucheri. var. canescens. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Leaf and peel volatile compounds of an interspecific citrus somatic hybrid [Citrus aurantifolia (Christm.) Swing. + Citrus paradisi Macfayden]

FLAVOUR AND FRAGRANCE JOURNAL, Issue 6 2002
Anne-Laure Gancel
Abstract The volatile compounds from leaves and peels of an interspecific citrus somatic hybrid, Citrus aurantifolia (Christm.) Swing. + Citrus paradisi Macfayden, obtained by fusion of protoplasts from lime, Citrus aurantifolia (cv. Mexican Lime) and grapefruit, Citrus paradisi (cv. Star Ruby), were extracted by pentane : ether (1 : 1) from liquid nitrogen ball-milled leaves and flavedo and examined by GC,MS in comparison to those of its parents. The hybrid quantitatively retained the ability of the lime parent to synthesize in its leaves the major monoterpene aldehydes (neral, geranial) the monoterpene alcohols (nerol, geraniol), and their acetates, and also the capacity of the grapefruit parent to produce a sesquiterpene aldehyde (,-sinensal) in its leaves and nootkatone in its peel. Conversely, synthesis of most sesquiterpene hydrocarbons and long chain aliphatic aldehydes, which are present in the lime parent leaves and peel, was strongly inhibited in the hybrid, as in the grapefruit parent. In comparison to its parents, the hybrid overproduced citronellal in its leaves and ,-sinensal and ,-sinensal in its peel. Based on these results, the future prospects for a better understanding of the inheritance mechanisms with regards to aroma biosynthesis in citrus leaves and peels are discussed. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Essential oil constituents of Melia dubia, a wild relative of Azadirachta indica growing in the Eastern Ghats of Peninsular India

FLAVOUR AND FRAGRANCE JOURNAL, Issue 4 2001
M. A. H. Nagalakshmi
Abstract The leaf essential oil of Melia dubia Cav. (Meliaceae) has been studied by GC,MS. The leaf essential oil consists chiefly of monoterpenes (35.71%) and oxygenated monoterpenes (27.98%), accompanied by a relatively much smaller amount of alkanes (11.17%), sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (9.26%) and phenylpropanoids (3.90%). The monoterpene camphene occurs as a major constituent (21.68%) of this leaf essential oil. It is accompanied by a noticeable amount of ,- and ,-pinene (3.12% and 5.13%, respectively) and a much smaller amount of sabinene (2.75%). The oxygenated monoterpenes are distinctly dominated by the presence of the bicyclic ketone camphor (17.85%), while iso-borneol and borneol are detected in much smaller amounts (4.15% and 1.12%, respectively). Copyright © 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Changes in volatile composition during fruit development and ripening of ,Alphonso' mango

JOURNAL OF THE SCIENCE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE, Issue 12 2009
Sagar S Pandit
Abstract BACKGROUND: Volatile blends of five developing and five ripening stages of mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Alphonso) were investigated along with those of flowers and leaves. Raw and ripe fruits of cv. Sabja were also used for comparison. RESULTS: A total of 55 volatiles belonging to various chemical classes such as aldehydes, alcohols, mono- and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, lactones and furanones were identified. In all Alphonso tissues monoterpenes quantitatively dominated, with 57,99% contribution; in particular, (Z)-ocimene was found in the highest amount. Ripeness was characterized by the de novo appearance of lactones and furanones in the blend of monoterpenes. Sabja was distinguished by the abundance of monoterpene hydrocarbons in the raw fruit, and that of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons and their derivatives in the ripe stage. CONCLUSION: Various stages of the Alphonso fruit during transition from flower to ripe fruit are characterized by unique volatile signatures that are distinguished from each other by the qualitative and quantitative appearance of different volatile compounds. Thus volatiles can be highly informative markers while studying the development and ripening of mango. Copyright © 2009 Society of Chemical Industry [source]