Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (idiopathic + intracranial_hypertension)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Cerebellar Tonsillar Herniation After Weight Loss in a Patient With Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

HEADACHE, Issue 1 2010
Jerome J. Graber MD
(Headache 2010;50:146-148) Acquired cerebellar tonsillar herniation is a known complication of lumboperitoneal shunt (LPS) for any indication, including idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri.1 While the underlying pathophysiology of IIH remains unknown, increasing body mass index is a clear risk factor for the development of IIH. We describe an obese patient with IIH unresponsive to LPS who developed symptoms of intracranial hypotension and cerebellar tonsillar herniation after bariatric surgery and a 50-kg weight loss. [source]


Topiramate-Responsive Headache Due to Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in Behçet Syndrome

HEADACHE, Issue 5 2004
Enrique Palacio MD
A 14-year-old adolescent was seen with an 8-month history of almost daily incapacitating headaches due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension in Behçet syndrome. All his clinical signs and symptoms, including headache, resolved 2 to 4 weeks after topiramate was initiated. An effect on carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes II and IV, reducing cerebrospinal fluid production, could potentially explain the beneficial effect of topiramate in intracranial hypertension. Further studies are necessary, however, to confirm the significance of topiramate in this indication. [source]


Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension and PostlumbarPuncture Headache

HEADACHE, Issue 2 2004
Yince Loh MD
Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and low cerebrospinal pressure are 2 conditions that are thought to be on opposite ends of the cerebrospinal pressure spectrum. Headache is the prominent component of both conditions. We describe a patient whose evaluation for idiopathic intracranial hypertension resulted in a postlumbar puncture headache. Although not entirely intuitive, we suggest that the 2 conditions can be present in the same patient. [source]


Obstruction of cerebral venous sinus secondary to idiopathic intracranial hypertension

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NEUROLOGY, Issue 12 2008
A. Stienen
Background:, Whether cerebral venous sinus obstruction is a cause or consequence of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is uncertain. Methods and results:, Among the nine children with IIH, five showed stenosis (n = 5) and occlusion (n = 1) of cerebral venous sinus on cranial magnetic resonance imaging (n = 4) or conventional angiography (n = 1), respectively. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging performed in four children showed complete regression of the venous pathology in one and partial regression in two of them. Conclusions:, Our data demonstrate that cerebral venous sinus obstruction is frequent and frequently transient in pediatric IIH and suggest that stenoses may result from elevated intracranial pressure. [source]


Cerebellar Tonsillar Herniation After Weight Loss in a Patient With Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension

HEADACHE, Issue 1 2010
Jerome J. Graber MD
(Headache 2010;50:146-148) Acquired cerebellar tonsillar herniation is a known complication of lumboperitoneal shunt (LPS) for any indication, including idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri.1 While the underlying pathophysiology of IIH remains unknown, increasing body mass index is a clear risk factor for the development of IIH. We describe an obese patient with IIH unresponsive to LPS who developed symptoms of intracranial hypotension and cerebellar tonsillar herniation after bariatric surgery and a 50-kg weight loss. [source]


Topiramate-Responsive Headache Due to Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension in Behçet Syndrome

HEADACHE, Issue 5 2004
Enrique Palacio MD
A 14-year-old adolescent was seen with an 8-month history of almost daily incapacitating headaches due to idiopathic intracranial hypertension in Behçet syndrome. All his clinical signs and symptoms, including headache, resolved 2 to 4 weeks after topiramate was initiated. An effect on carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes II and IV, reducing cerebrospinal fluid production, could potentially explain the beneficial effect of topiramate in intracranial hypertension. Further studies are necessary, however, to confirm the significance of topiramate in this indication. [source]


Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension and PostlumbarPuncture Headache

HEADACHE, Issue 2 2004
Yince Loh MD
Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and low cerebrospinal pressure are 2 conditions that are thought to be on opposite ends of the cerebrospinal pressure spectrum. Headache is the prominent component of both conditions. We describe a patient whose evaluation for idiopathic intracranial hypertension resulted in a postlumbar puncture headache. Although not entirely intuitive, we suggest that the 2 conditions can be present in the same patient. [source]


Transverse sinus septum: A new aetiology of idiopathic intracranial hypertension?

JOURNAL OF MEDICAL IMAGING AND RADIATION ONCOLOGY, Issue 2 2004
Rathan M Subramaniam
Summary A venographic cryptic stenosis at the junction of middle and lateral third of the transverse sinus has been observed in patients suffering from idiopathic intracranial hypertension. After reviewing the anatomical and embryological literature of the transverse sinus, 20 transverse sinuses were explored (in a pilot study of 10 human cadavers) in order to determine the anatomical basis of this stenosis. The presence of septa of varying sizes was observed. We conclude that the presence of a large septum is one of the causes of venographic cryptic stenosis observed in these patients and might be one of the aetiological factors involved in idiopathic intracranial hypertension. [source]


Post dural puncture headache in a pediatric patient with idiopathic intracranial hypertension

PEDIATRIC ANESTHESIA, Issue 9 2005
OLUBUKOLA O. NAFIU MD FRCA
Summary We describe the occurrence of postdural puncture headache (PPDH) in an adolescent with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and its successful management with an epidural blood patch. PPDH is a very rare occurrence in patients with intracranial hypertension and is described as a paradoxical situation in the literature. There are only two previous case reports (in adults) of the possible association. A 15-year-old obese patient with a diagnosis of IIH had an uneventful diagnostic spinal tap using a 22G Quincke needle in the pediatric emergency department but returned 24 h later with PPDH. After a failed trial of conservative management, she had an uneventful but curative epidural blood patch with 15 ml of autologous venous blood and was able to return to school the day after the blood patch. Follow-up review by her neuro-ophthalmologist shows resolution of her headaches, considerable improvement in her visual field defect and resolution of papilledema. This is the first report of PPDH and its successful management with an epidural blood patch in a pediatric patient with IIH. [source]


Endoscopic Endonasal Management of Pseudotumor Cerebri: Is it Effective?

THE LARYNGOSCOPE, Issue 7 2007
Ashok K. Gupta MD
Abstract Purpose: To study the efficacy and safety of endoscopic endonasal optic nerve fenestration for the management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Design: A prospective study at a tertiary care center. Patients and Methods: All patients with a final diagnosis of IIH from July 2001 to March 2005 were included and subjected to detailed neuro-ophthalmologic examination and endoscopic endonasal optic nerve fenestration. Postoperative visual acuity and the perimetry was compared with the preoperative status, and the results were analyzed using the ,2 test. Results: Of the 18 patients included in the study, 17 had improvement in vision postoperatively. Fifteen patients had visual deterioration in the other eye as well, and of these, 12 had improvement, obviating the need for surgery on the other side. Complications were minimal and in the form of synechiae in two of the cases. Discussion: A number of procedures have been described for the management of this entity, and each is associated with a significant morbidity; therefore, there was a need for a minimally invasive procedure. The procedure adopted in the series is minimally invasive and is associated with a 94.5% success rate and minimal morbidity. Conclusions: Endoscopic endonasal optic nerve fenestration is a safe, minimally invasive, and extremely effective procedure for the management of IIH. [source]


Persistent visual loss in malignant idiopathic intracranial hypertension

ACTA OPHTHALMOLOGICA, Issue 8 2009
Aurore Mensah
No abstract is available for this article. [source]