Free Recall Test (free + recall_test)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Caffeine (4,mg/kg) influences sustained attention and delayed free recall but not memory predictions

HUMAN PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY: CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL, Issue 4 2001
William L. Kelemen
Abstract This experiment was conducted to examine the influence of a moderate dose of caffeine (4,mg/kg) on delayed memory, metamemory, and sustained attention. One hundred and forty-two volunteers ingested either caffeine or placebo during a study session which included three different memory tasks (free recall, cued recall, and recognition), and they made predictions of future memory performance. On day 2, participants again ingested either caffeine or placebo and completed memory tests. Sustained attention performance was measured on both days, and caffeine reliably improved hit rates and response latencies. A reliable drug-state interaction was detected only in the free recall test of memory. Caffeine did not affect the magnitude or accuracy of memory predictions, but there was some evidence that expectancies about caffeine were related to cognitive performance. Overall, caffeine's impact on memory and metamemory was not robust in this study. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Feigning amnesia undermines memory for a mock crime

APPLIED COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 5 2004
Kim Van Oorsouw
Using scripts, previous studies by Christianson and co-workers have suggested that simulating amnesia undermines memory. Relying on a more realistic mock crime paradigm, the current study examined whether feigning amnesia has memory-undermining effects. After committing a mock crime, one group of participants (n,=,21) was instructed to simulate amnesia for the event. Their performance on immediate free recall tests was compared to that of participants (n,=,20) who were instructed to respond honestly during free recall. After one week, simulators, honestly responding controls, and a second control group (n,=,20) that had not undergone immediate memory testing after the pertinent event completed free recall tests. This time, all participants were instructed to perform as well as they could. At the follow-up free recall test, both ex-simulators and controls who underwent the memory testing for the first time performed significantly worse than the honestly responding controls. Thus, the current study supports the idea that simulating amnesia in order to evade responsibility for a crime has detrimental effects on true memory of the crime. Our results also suggest that this effect can best be understood in terms of lack of rehearsal. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Memory with emotional content, brain amygdala and Alzheimer's disease

ACTA NEUROLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 2 2009
R. R. Schultz
Objectives,,, A highly adaptive aspect of human memory is the enhancement of explicit, consciously accessible memory by emotional stimuli. We studied the performance of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and elderly controls using a memory battery with emotional content, and we correlated these results with the amygdala and hippocampus volume. Methods,,, Twenty controls and 20 early AD patients were subjected to the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) and to magnetic resonance imaging-based volumetric measurements of the medial temporal lobe structures. Results,,, The results show that excluding control group subjects with 5 or more years of schooling, both groups showed improvement with pleasant or unpleasant figures for the IAPS in an immediate free recall test. Likewise, in a delayed free recall test, both the controls and the AD group showed improvement for pleasant pictures, when education factor was not controlled. The AD group showed improvement in the immediate and delayed free recall test proportional to the medial temporal lobe structures, with no significant clinical correlation between affective valence and amygdala volume. Conclusion,,, AD patients can correctly identify emotions, at least at this early stage, but this does not improve their memory performance. [source]


Verbal memory performance improved via an acute administration of D -amphetamine

HUMAN PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY: CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL, Issue 5 2007
Inge Zeeuws
Abstract Background An improved long-term retention of verbal memory was observed after an acute D -amphetamine administration. It was proposed that D -amphetamine modulates consolidation, but a possible drug effect on retrieval could not be rejected. Objectives We want to provide additional support for the consolidation hypothesis, and investigate whether an influence on intervening retrieval can be refuted. Methods Thirty-six male paid volunteers participated in a double blind, counterbalanced, placebo-controlled design in which the number of intermediate free recall tests was manipulated. Results A significant D -amphetamine facilitation effect on recall performance emerged 1 h and 1 day after list learning. In line with the consolidation hypothesis, no effect was found on immediate tests. Importantly, the number of intermediate retrievals did not affect the magnitude of the drug effect, suggesting that the D -amphetamine facilitation effect is independent of retrieval. Conclusion The D -amphetamine facilitation effect on verbal memory does not involve a modulation of the initial encoding or short-term memory (STM) processes. Moreover, the drug does not enhance long-term retention by acting on intervening retrieval processes. The current findings are in line with the conjecture of an involvement of the consolidation process in the D -amphetamine facilitation effect on verbal memory in healthy humans. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Feigning amnesia undermines memory for a mock crime

APPLIED COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 5 2004
Kim Van Oorsouw
Using scripts, previous studies by Christianson and co-workers have suggested that simulating amnesia undermines memory. Relying on a more realistic mock crime paradigm, the current study examined whether feigning amnesia has memory-undermining effects. After committing a mock crime, one group of participants (n,=,21) was instructed to simulate amnesia for the event. Their performance on immediate free recall tests was compared to that of participants (n,=,20) who were instructed to respond honestly during free recall. After one week, simulators, honestly responding controls, and a second control group (n,=,20) that had not undergone immediate memory testing after the pertinent event completed free recall tests. This time, all participants were instructed to perform as well as they could. At the follow-up free recall test, both ex-simulators and controls who underwent the memory testing for the first time performed significantly worse than the honestly responding controls. Thus, the current study supports the idea that simulating amnesia in order to evade responsibility for a crime has detrimental effects on true memory of the crime. Our results also suggest that this effect can best be understood in terms of lack of rehearsal. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]