Endocervical Component (endocervical + component)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


A CRITICAL LOOK AT PAP ADEQUECY: ARE OUR CRITERIA SATISFACTORY?

CYTOPATHOLOGY, Issue 2006
D.R. Bolick
Liquid based Pap (LBP) specimen adequacy is a highly documented, yet poorly understood cornerstone of our GYN cytology practice. Each day, as cytology professionals, we make adequacy assessments and seldom wonder how the criteria we use were established. Are the criteria appropriate? Are they safe? What is the scientific data that support them? Were they clinically and statistically tested or refined to achieve optimal patient care? In this presentation, we will take a fresh look at what we know about Pap specimen adequacy and challenge some of the core assumptions of our daily practice. LBP tests have a consistent, well-defined surface area for screening, facilitating the quantitative estimates of slide cellularity. This provides an unprecedented opportunity to establish reproducible adequacy standards that can be subjected to scientific scrutiny and rigorous statistical analysis. Capitalizing on this opportunity, the TBS2001 took the landmark step to define specimen adequacy quantitatively, and set the threshold for a satisfactory LBP at greater than 5,000 well visualized squamous epithelial cells. To date, few published studies have attempted to evaluate the validity or receiver operator characteristics for this threshold, define an optimal threshold for clinical utility or assess risks of detection failure in ,satisfactory' but relatively hypocellular Pap specimens. Five years of cumulative adequacy and cellularity data of prospectively collected Pap samples from the author's laboratory will be presented, which will serve as a foundation for a discussion on ,Pap failure'. A relationship between cellularity and detection of HSIL will be presented. Risk levels for Pap failure will be presented for Pap samples of different cellularities. The effect of different cellularity criterion on unsatisfactory Pap rates and Pap failure rates will be demonstrated. Results from this data set raise serious questions as to the safety of current TBS2001 adequacy guidelines and suggest that the risk of Pap failure in specimens with 5,000 to 20 000 squamous cells on the slide is significantly higher than those assumed by the current criteria. TBS2001 designated all LBP to have the same adequacy criterion. Up to this point, it has been assumed that ThinPrep, SurePath, or any other LBP would be sufficiently similar that they should have the same adequacy criteria. Data for squamous cellularity and other performance characteristics of ThinPrep and SurePath from the author's laboratory will be compared. Intriguing data involving the recently approved MonoPrep Pap Test will be reviewed. MonoPrep clinical trial data show the unexpected finding of a strong correlation between abundance of endocervical component and the detection of high-grade lesions, provoking an inquiry of a potential new role for a quantitative assessment of the transition zone component. The current science of LBP adequacy criteria is underdeveloped and does not appear to be founded on statistically valid methods. This condition calls us forward as a body of practitioners and scientists to rigorously explore, clarify and define the fundamental nature of cytology adequacy. As we forge this emerging science, we will improve diagnostic performance, guide the development of future technologies, and better serve the patients who give us their trust. Reference:, Birdsong GG: Pap smear adequacy: Is our understanding satisfactory? Diagn Cytopathol. 2001 Feb; 24(2): 79,81. [source]


Rapid review of liquid-based smears as a quality control measure

DIAGNOSTIC CYTOPATHOLOGY, Issue 3 2004
Sheryl Henderson M.Med.Sc.(Cytol.)
Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a standardized method of rapid review (RR) of monolayer preparations for the identification of abnormalities, the presence of an endocervical component and infectious agents. A total of 200 ThinPrep (Cytyc, Boxborough, MA) slides representing the spectrum of abnormalities commonly encountered in cervical/vaginal cytologic specimens was retrieved from archive. The study set comprised 129 cases within normal limits (WNL); 36 low-grade epithelial abnormalities (LGEA); 28 high-grade epithelial abnormalities (HGEA), including 2 endocervical adenocarcinomas in situ (AIS) and 7 carcinomas. Eighteen false negative (FN) cases were also included for study. Originally missed on initial review, these cases were found to be abnormal on quality control review (17 LGEA; 1 AIS). Commonly encountered infectious agents were represented and included Candida albicans, Trichomonas vaginalis, herpes simplex virus, and Actinomyces. The slides were reviewed using a standardized method of RR (turret technique, for 60 sec) by three experienced screeners masked to the original reference diagnosis. Median sensitivity for LGEA was 70% (range, 67,72%); HGEA, 69% (range, 54,80%); and FN, 65% (range, 56,78%). Specificity remained high, median specificity for LGEA was 95%; HGEA, 97%; and FN, 100%. There was no significant overcalling of any diagnostic category. The chi-square test at P < 0.05 showed no significant difference between RR and full manual rescreen of the ThinPrep smears in this study. While no statistical difference was proven, the sensitivity measurements for all categories of abnormality were moderate due to the high proportion of atypical cases included into the study set. Abnormalities on the monolayer preparations frequently displayed fewer, smaller groups of disaggregated cells with rounded cytoplasmic outlines that were difficult to discern on RR. Interobserver variation was noted. Monolayers with a paucity of diagnostic cells and those displaying subtle nuclear atypia were often overlooked. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2004;31:141,146. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Outcome in women with no endocervical component on cervical cytology after treatment for high-grade cervical dysplasia

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 4 2009
Alice HUANG
Background:, Cervical cancer and its precursors still remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality despite adequate screening programs. It is now established practice in Australia that a Pap smear without an endocervical component, which is otherwise negative, does not warrant an earlier repeat smear. This study aims to determine if the lack of an endocervical component in women with previously treated high-grade abnormalities of the cervix increases the risk of subsequent cytological abnormalities. Method:, Data were retrieved from an electronic database in the Oncology and Dysplasia Unit at The Royal Women's Hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Women who underwent treatment for high-grade cervical abnormalities from 2000,2004 were included in the study. Women with negative cytology immediately after their operations were first identified, and the incidence of subsequent cytological abnormalities was calculated and then separated according to their endocervical status. Results:, Of the 1260 women in the study population, seven developed high-grade abnormalities (six with an endocervical component and one without) and 107 developed low-grade abnormalities (98 with an endocervical component and nine without). Conclusion:, The lack of an endocervical component was not statistically significantly associated with a higher incidence of either high-grade or low-grade abnormalities. Therefore, women who have had previous treatments for high-grade abnormalities do not need to have earlier repeat smears or intervention if the cytology lacks an endocervical component. [source]