Economic Growth And Development (economic + growth_and_development)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Revisiting the Micro and Small Enterprise Sector in Kenya

HISTORY COMPASS (ELECTRONIC), Issue 6 2009
Bessie House-Soremekun
The purpose of this article is to review the state of the literature on the Micro and Small Enterprise (MSE) sector in Kenya to examine how entrepreneurs affect economic growth and development. First, it provides a brief assessment of Kenya's development prospects in the 21st century. Second, it interrogates the literature with regard to some of the theoretical and empirical studies performed on the microenterprise sector in the global south on a general level, and in Kenya, from 1970,2009. Third, it discusses the important role of women in economic development and entrepreneurship. [source]


Defining sustainability: a conceptual orientation

JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY & BIOTECHNOLOGY, Issue 4 2007
Robert O. Vos
Abstract Despite the ubiquity of the concept of sustainability, defining the term and construing meaning for different contexts is difficult. This paper presents several archetypes of sustainability that are useful for classifying and understanding existing definitions. Definitions that emphasize one part or another of the core concept of sustainability will be necessary at varying scales and in different contexts. This paper presents a conceptual guide that contrasts a dominant paradigm of economic growth and development with ,thick' and ,thin' versions of sustainability. Definitions of sustainability are explored in terms of their orientation to the ontology of nature, substitutability of resources, economic growth, population growth, role of technology, and social equity. Copyright 2007 Society of Chemical Industry [source]


COMMENTS ON FACTOR PRICES AND INCOME DISTRIBUTION IN LESS INDUSTRIALISED ECONOMIES, 1870,1939: REFOCUSING ON THE FRONTIER

AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 3 2007
Knick HarleyArticle first published online: 7 OCT 200
economic institutions; factor prices; frontier; globalisation A great deal of the current research into nineteenth- and twentieth-century globalisation has been focused through a neoclassical trade theory lens. Applying the Stopler-Samuelson paradigm from Heckscher-Ohlin trade theory, the result is an approach that sees price convergence as pivotal in defining, identifying, and measuring globalisation. This focus, however, obscures the implications of frontier incorporation and other insights achieved by viewing nineteenth-century globalisation as a mechanism whereby peripheral economies were incorporated into the core of organised economic activity. A frontier-centred perspective also reintroduces the role of economic institutions as a crucial element of economic growth and development. [source]


Flourishing branches, wilting core: research in modern Indian economic history

AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 3 2004
Tirthankar Roy
The core theme in modern Indian economic history until recently was economic growth in colonial India and models explaining stylised facts about growth or stagnation. From the 1980s, research moved away from the general toward more specific and local issues, a trend that has allowed new questions to be asked, has approached other fields and introduced a healthy scepticism for overarching models. But it also made macro-questions somewhat outdated, thereby weakening the link between history and models of economic growth and development. This essay reviews scholarship on new themes and asks how problems of economic growth can be motivated anew. [source]


Staple theory and export-led growth: constructing differential growth

AUSTRALIAN ECONOMIC HISTORY REVIEW, Issue 3 2003
Morris Altman
The staple theory is a subset of the export-led growth hypothesis, designed to explain the growth and economic development of resource-rich economies. It is a theory that has been misunderstood and is seen to be at odds with the stylised facts of economic growth and development as well as with mainstream neoclassical wisdom. This article presents a brief and critical historiography of the staple theory from which a simple model of staple growth and development is gleaned. As well, data are presented which suggest that staple theory remains an important analytical tool to help explain economic development and growth. [source]